The Structure of Information Systems

Posted by Romeo Elias on Fri, Dec 08, 2006 @ 09:34 AM

On behalf of ygenc

In a perfect world, all Information Systems (IS) would bring the necessary structure to ongoing processes, consequently improving them. Glitches in project and process management would automatically be fixed. The challenge for developers of project and process management software is that business professionals now demand this “perfect world” to become a reality.

Many business professionals receive a fat slap in the face after implementing project process management software. It looked perfect, with its long list of benefits and features -- the mistake was looking only at the diversity of functionalities.

An IS system is there to maximize efficiency and minimize human errors. A good tool is capable of reflecting existing processes rather than imposing processes. Imposed processes are typically theoretical or defined by somebody other than the creator of those processes. The best tools should also be capable of adjusting themselves to updates to processes.

This makes flexible, end-user defined applications the best solutions for project and process management. Yet, not many people look at “user-control” as a requirement that must be included on the list of a solution’s features and benefits. User-controlled systems are flexible enough to reflect the current processes of any organization, as well as to accommodate any future changes. And these changes can be done by the end-user rather than a software development company.

Don’t be fooled by a long list of features and benefits on a flashy website promoting a project and process management solution that is not flexible. A user-customizable platform is a must for any organization wanting to maximize efficiency through project and process management software.